Challenging some assumptions about skills recognition

There is often an assumption that Skills Recognition is highly reliant on documentary evidence and depends on a lengthy and wordy written application process. Another assumption is that it is not as rigorous as conventional training and assessment.

Assumption one:

Skills Recognition is highly reliant on only documentary evidence and also that it requires a lengthy and wordy written application process. This is not the case.

Skills Recognition is not just about paper evidence! Skills Recognition includes practical demonstrations and challenge tests.

Assumption two:

Skills Recognition is not as rigorous as conventional training and assessment.

It can be demonstrated that Skills Recognition is no less rigorous than other forms of assessment.
A requirement under the ASQA and the AQF (2013) is that Skills Recognition cannot be less (or more) rigorous than other assessment methods.

Assumption three:

Skills Recognition does not involve how competence can be demonstrated.

Practical demonstrations play a large role in the skills recognition process, and these are particularly appropriate for the rail industry where practical evidence is needed in particular for rail safety workers. Oral evidence, photographs, videos, electronic records and work samples are also evidence.
In some rail organisations, it is mandated that here must be at least three different types of evidence.

In fact, as a requirement under the Australian Quality Skills Authority (ASQA) SR cannot be less (or more) rigorous than other assessment methods.
Skills recognition does not need to involve a lengthy and complicated application process, or depend on extensive written evidence and, according to the ASQA, it should not.

Some people, including applicants, employers and assessors, believe that skills recognition entails so much work that it is easier to just do the training. This indicates poor skills recognition practice.

Skills recognition should not be seen as an optional extra—in most circumstances it is a requirement under the ASQA and AQF (2013) for RTOs and enterprise RTOs to offer skills recognition to applicants who are enrolling in nationally accredited training.